Tuesday, 30 October 2012

Breakthrough Breast Cancer Westminster Fly-in

When I walked into Westminster and confronted one of Stephen Pounds caseworkers. I went into a rant of look at my arm and why I had turned up late to our meeting. I was apologetic and angry because I knew I had to go back to the big CC hospital with a smile tomorrow for my 3rd cycle of chemo. I had waited one hour and twenty minutes to be told by a nurse your oncologist does not need to see you because your bloods are ok and you look fine. You are OK? 
This of course put hell into me because I have not seen handsome Mr L since he told me my veins were fine. I personally wanted Handsome Mr L to see the damage he has helped create just because he would not listen or pay attention to my notes.
Breakthrough Breast Cancer Westminster Fly-in has been an eye opener. 

The three aims they are focused on…

Quote:

1.     Increase awareness of the signs and symptoms of breast cancer through our Touch Look Check breast awareness message.

2.    Continue to drive early diagnosis and make sure eligible women have access to the best possible breast screening services.

3.    Make sure that everyone with breast cancer has access to the right treatment for their type of breast cancer at the right time.

I had to think of a way to put at least one of those aims which is important to me across. Being a diabetic I have what I call a MOT. This MOT involves having my eyes, circulation, full bloods and weight checked along with blood pressure. The full blood’s was how they picked up on my cancer.
Why can’t we bring in something similar when we have a smear to educate young women the importance of early detection. This would be ideal because you can then introduce them to the TLC campaign. As I explained to the caseworker for Stephen Pound you would not climb in a car without a MOT. Why then would you climb into your own skin? This young man’s eyes lit up and he replied you have got a point there.
Then I asked why can’t cancer patients in London have a free oyster card? Those with disabilities, over 65 and children do. I highlighted the importance of choice and how that card can help in easing the stress of travel. I explained how fatigue during treatment can leave you helpless. Again the caseworker took notes and agreed it would help.
Yes again to implement these aims cost money, but I have a target. I also mention about setting up something for those young women with children affected by breast cancer and the transition. During the last three years my young daughter has had a lot of questions and zero out let. Maybe it is me and maybe I’m not looking in the right places, but the journey of cancer treatment is not family friendly when it comes to reassurance. Our little soldiers are being bombarded with Kick cancer! And various other television campaigns and this had led to more questions from my young daughter.
On leaving the caseworker gave me a hug and requested I stay in touch. I said to him, look I'm ok, but those that are out there silently suffering aren't ok, that is what we are trying to point out to you. 

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